The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe

The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe Dramatic story of World War II in the air How the U.S built an air force of 2.3 million men after starting with 45,000 and defeated the world s best air force Vivid accounts of aerial combat In order to defeat Germany in World War II, the Allies needed to destroy the Third Reich s industry and invade its territory, but before they could effectively do either, they had to defeat the Luftwaffe, whose state of the art aircraft and experienced pilots protected German industry and would batter any attempted invasion This difficult task fell largely to the U.S., which, at the outset, lacked the necessary men, materiel, and training Over the ensuing years, thanks to visionary leadership and diligent effort, the U.S Army Air Force developed strategies and tactics and assembled a well trained force that convincingly defeated the Luftwaffe. Download The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe Author Jay A. Stout – cricketworldcuplivestreaming.com

Jay A Stout is a retired Marine Corps fighter pilot An Indiana native and graduate of Purdue University, he was commissioned during June 1981 and was designated a naval aviator on 13 May 1983 His first fleet assignment was to F 4S Phantoms at MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina Following a stint as an instructor pilot at NAS Chase Field Texas from 1986 to 1989, he transitioned to the F A 18 Hornet Jay A Stout is a retired Marine Corps fighter pilot An Indiana native and graduate of Purdue University, he was commissioned during June 1981 and was designated a naval aviator on 13 May 1983 His first fleet assignment was to F 4S Phantoms at MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina Following a stint as an instructor pilot at NAS Chase Field Texas from 1986 to 1989, he transitioned to the F A 18 Hornet He flew the Hornet from bases on both coasts and ultimately retired from MCAS Miramar during 2001.Aside from his flying assignments, he served as the executive officer of 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, and in a variety of additional assignments with various staffs around the world During his twenty year career he flewthan 4,500 flight hours, including 37 combat missions during Operation Desert Storm.Following his military career Stout worked for a very short time as an airline pilot before being furloughed after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 He subsequently flew for the Kuwait Air Force for a year before returning to the States where he now works for as a senior analyst for a leading defense contractor.Lieutenant Colonel Stout s writing has been read on the floor of the U.S Senate and has been published in various professional journals and newspapers around the nation Works published while he was on active duty addressed controversial topics women in the military, the MV 22 Osprey, effectiveness of the AV 8B Harrier, etc and took viewpoints that were often at odds with senior military leadership Nevertheless, his cogent arguments and forthrightness contributed considerably to his credibility Indeed, his expertise is widely recognized and he has made many appearances as a combat aviation expert on news networks such as Fox, Al Jazeera and National Public Radio

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  • Hardcover
  • 420 pages
  • The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe
  • Jay A. Stout
  • English
  • 09 January 2018
  • 0811706591

10 thoughts on “The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe

  1. says:

    This is a book that I might have rated higher if I hadinterest in the air war It is well written and while it doesn t delve to deeply into the conduct of the war, or the decisions that caused certain things to be done, it does deliver a number of great first person accounts from both sides of the fence Another thing that impressed me about this book was the range ...

  2. says:

    Makes a good case for the US Army Air Force being the primary and proximate agent in the death of the German Air Force in World War Two A gratifying blend of history, commentary and eye witness accounts, including the German perspective Detailed, maybe too detailed A paragraph about a general s father is overkill Lots of statistics and several good photographs.Mentions the British and Russian air wars Chilling examples of the inhumanity of Soviet officers to their own people No mention of Makes a good case for the US Army Air Force being the primary and proximate agent in the death of the German Air Force in World War Two A gratifying blend of history, commentary and eye witness accounts, including the German perspective Detailed, maybe too detailed A paragraph about a general s father is overkill Lots of statistics and several good photographs.Mentions the British and Russian air wars Chilling examples of the inhumanity of Soviet officers to their own people No mention of the trails and contributions of black American airmen.Pathos as well as heroics and drama The following quote was from Luftwaffe Me 262 pilot and late Chief of Staff of the West German Luftwaffe , Johannes Steinhoff, in April 1945 We were like dayflies who had come to the end of their day, where the dream dissolves into noth...

  3. says:

    When I first picked this book up, I figured it would be about the fighter pilots of the USAAF, with lots of stories about the aces and such Turns out there was some of that, but lots of stories from bomber pilots and crewmen, ground support personnel, and some perspective from the German side as well Since I ve read about the great fighter pilots such as Gabreski, Zemke, Gentile, Blakeslee, and Preddy in other books, it was refreshing to read about the recollections of those pilots who didn t When I first picked this book up, I figured it would be about the fighter pilots of the USAAF, with lots of stories about the aces and such Turns out there was some of that, but lots of stories from bomber pilots and crewmen, ground support personnel, and some perspective from the German side as well Since I ve read about the great fighter pilots such as Gabreski, Zemke, Gentile, Blakeslee, and Preddy in other books, it was refreshing to read about the recollections of those pilots who didn t achieve the same level of success.The book...

  4. says:

    I saw this book described as a history of the average Joe of the USAAF the story of the flyers not of the leaders so I was a bit surprised by the first six chapters or so being mainly a top level history of Happ Arnold and the early Army Air Force development Nonetheless, it was a really interesting history, providing a solid background for the rest of the book.It is hard for this book not to come across like an America is the best, America won the war single handedly, America s planes f I saw this book described as a history of the average Joe of the USAAF the story of the flyers not of the leaders so I was a bit surprised by the first six ch...

  5. says:

    A good book, covering the prolonged struggle between the Army Air Forces, specifically the strategic bombing forces and their escorting fighters, and the Luftwaffe over Europe from 1943 to 1945 The book also delves into the enormous training and equipping system developed in the US to provide the European theater with a constant stream of highly trained airmen and machines The title is very accurate to the book, it is filled with the personal memoirs of those who fought There is little about A good book, covering...

  6. says:

    I ve always been fascinated by the romanticized notions of the US Army Air Cops and USAAF and wanted to learnI really enjoyed this book and it didn t disappoint I wanted a comprehensive history chronicling of the USAAF during WWII as well as first hand combat accounts in the ETO and this book has all of it I also enjoyed how the book spent an equal amount of time covering fighter as well as bomber pilots crews to give an overall view of the army air forces in Europe during the war Jay I ve always been fascinated by the romanticized notions of the US Army Air Cops and USAAF and wanted to learnI really enjoyed th...

  7. says:

    This was an excellent book about the Air War in the European Theater during World War 2 Though it did have some personal accounts by the combat veterans who flew for both sides, the thing that made this book different is how it approached all the logistics involved in fielding a massive air corps from scratch I have never delved into the administrative necessities despite having read extensively about this topic While I knew the USA outproduced the Axis powers within a very short time, I did This was an excellent book about the Air War in the European Theater during World War 2 Though it did have some personal accounts by the combat veterans who flew for both sides, the thing that made this book different is how it approached all the logistics involved in fielding a massive air corps from scratch I have never delved into the administrative necessities despite having read extensively about this topic While I knew the USA outproduced the Axis powers within a very short time, I did not really consider the hoops and hurdles necessary to train first cla...

  8. says:

    Kind of interesting that I finished this book on the 65th birthday September 18, 1947 of the United States Air Force as a separate service branch This book details the huge expansion of the USAAF during World War II and how our overwhelming edge of trained men and equipment defeated the German Luftwaffe and won the air war over Germany.At the beginning of the war, the USAAF was a skeletal force with antiquated equipment against a thoroughly modern Luftwaffe that was barely checked by Great Br Kind of interesting that I finished this book on the 65th birthday September 18, 1947 of the United States Air Force as a separate service branch This book details the huge expansion of the USAAF during World War II and how our overwhelming edge of trained men and equipment defeated the German Luftwaffe and won the air war over Germany.At the beginning of the war, the USAAF was a skeletal force with antiquated equipment against a thoroughly modern Luftwaffe that was barely checked by Great Britain in the Battle of Britain This book narrates the growth of US air power under Arnold, Spaatz, and Eaker, the ...

  9. says:

    I have read several books on WWII and the pains taken on the ground, but this one caught my eye when talking only about the air.What I learned It was again a complete numbers game and once again like on tanks we produced wayairplanes not only that but we trained manypilots and had them cycle through service muchquickly 100 octane fuel was a advantage, even if just a few mph in speed, hooray for the petroleum industry the human stories were very interesting to me, jumping I have read several books on WWII and the pains taken on the ground, but this one caught my eye when talking only about the air.What I learned It was again a complete numbers game and once again like on tanks we produced wayairplanes not only that but we trained manypilots and had them cycle through service muchquickly 100 octane fuel wa...

  10. says:

    Thank you, , for affording this book to me By 1939, the Germans were well prepared for war over land, water and air They had superior planes and well trained air men.They failed to count on America s can do spirit.The German Luftwaffe was tearing the continent and England apart The United States entered the war with the Allied Powers Roosevelt, Stalin and Churchill were an unlikely threesom The United States trained her pilots on the job The British weregutsy than polite The R Thank you, , for affording this book to me By 1939, the Germans were well prepared for war over land, water and air They had superior planes and well trained air men.They failed to count on America s can do spirit.The German Luftwaffe was tearing the continent and England apart The United States entered the war with the Allied Powers Roosevelt, Stalin and Churchill were an unlikely threesom The United States trained her pilots on the job The British weregutsy than polite Th...

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