An Italian Education


      An Italian Education
Tim Parks first bestseller, Italian Neighbors, chronicled his initiation into Italian society and cultural life Reviewers everywhere hailed it as a bravissimo performance Now he turns to his children born and bred in Italy and their milieu in a small village near Verona With the splendid eye for detail, character, and intrigue that has brought him acclaim as a novelist, he creates a fascinating portrait of Italian family life, at school, at home, in church, and in the countryside This panoramic journey winds up with a deliciously seductive evocation of an Italian beach holiday that epitomizes everything that is quintessentially Italian Here is an insider s Italy, re created by one of the most gifted writers of his generation Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post Free Read Books An Italian Education by Tim Parks – cricketworldcuplivestreaming.com

Born in Manchester in 1954, Tim Parks grew up in London and studied at Cambridge and Harvard In 1981 he moved to Italy where he has lived ever since, raising a family of three children He has written fourteen novels including Europa shortlisted for the Booker prize , Destiny, Cleaver, and most recently In Extremis.During the nineties he wrote two, personal and highly popular accounts of his life in northern Italy, Italian Neighbours and An Italian Education These were complemented in 2002 by A Season with Verona, a grand overview of Italian life as seen through the passion of football Other non fiction works include a history of the Medici bank in 15th century Florence, Medici Money and a memoir on health, illness and meditation, Teach Us to Sit Still In 2013 Tim published his most recent non fiction work on Italy, Italian Ways, on and off the rails from Milan to Palermo.Aside from his own writing, Tim has translated works by Moravia, Calvino, Calasso, Machiavelli and Leopardi his critical book, Translating Style is considered a classic in its field He is presently working on a translation of Cesare Pavese s masterpiece, The Moon and the Bonfires.A regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and the London Review of Books, his many essays are collected in Hell and Back, The Fighter, A Literary Tour of Italy, and Life and Work Over the last five years he has been publishing a series of blogs on writing, reading, translation and the like in the New York Review online These have recently been collected in Where I am Reading From and Pen in Hand.

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  • Paperback
  • 338 pages
  • An Italian Education
  • Tim Parks
  • English
  • 14 February 2019
  • 0380727609

10 thoughts on “ An Italian Education

  1. says:

    When Parks is at his best you ll be truly whisked into his hot, hilarious, frustrating, delicious, lost in translation Italian world Following on from his Italian Neighbors, here he covers parenthood as he and his wife raise two kids, Michele and Stefi, in a town near Verona As in the previous book we get lots of sketches of village life, flora, fauna and other characters like his new neighbors, the insurance salesman and his in laws There s also a fair amount of pointing out Italian foibles When Parks is at his best you ll be truly whisked into his hot, hilarious, frustrating, delicious, lost in translation Italian world Following on from his Italian Neighbors, here...

  2. says:

    Italian lullabies, like Ninna Nonna, Ninna O Questo bimbo, a chi lo do Nap my gramma, nap OH, This baby, to whom shall I give Or Italian recipes, rather imaginative ones 111 Wonderful on Italian contradictions the assumption that all workers are shiftless, whereas all thieves are most efficient, competent Then, public speaking, always read off cards or prompters no merit here to speaking or thinking on one s feet However great Italians perform in private, they plod in public Italian lullabies, like Ninna Nonna, Ninna O Questo bimbo, a chi lo do Nap my gramma, nap OH, This baby, to whom shall I give Or Italian recipes, rather imaginative ones 111 Wonderful on Italian contradictions the assumption that all workers are shiftless, whereas all thieves are most efficient, competent Then, public speaking, always read off cards or prompters no merit here to speaking or thinking on one s feet However great Italians perform in private, they plod in public Proudly Doubtless the effect of plodding schooling, I add, having watched my grandkids grow in Milan Latin and Greek at classical public HS 160 forms of the Greek verb Any real translation No So much Italian education, for a century, has emphasized orthodox ideas expressed in extravagant, exhortatory, pridefu...

  3. says:

    There is nothing as eye opening as bringing up your children abroad Your children, who obviously are your flesh and blood, and who, by an assumed definition should in large part become like you, slowly and inevitably grow up to assume an identity that is not like yoursChildren adopt the ways of both their parents obviously, but also the ways of their teachers, carers, people from TV, friends and neighbours, and whereas grown ups choose which of the new ways suit them, children become them There is nothing as eye opening as bringing up your children abroad Your children, who obviously are your flesh and blood, and who, by an assumed definition should in large part become like you, slowly and inevitably grow up to assume an identity that is not like yoursChildren adopt the ways of both their parents obviously, but also the ways of their teachers, carers, people from TV, friends and neighbours, and whereas grown ups choose which of the new ways suit them, children become them instead, in ways that a grownups neve...

  4. says:

    Wasn t a big fan of this book Yes it had its good points but for the most part it was boring.

  5. says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, but will say two thingsI had already read the author s previous book, Italian Neighbours..in which he and his italian wife buy a flat in a village, and come up against make friends with a cast of characters who I instantly I fell in love with And right at the beginning of this book he talks about childhood experiences of visiting the seasi...

  6. says:

    I read this in lieu of Italian Neighbors a book club pick , which my library does not have Inexpicably, they did have this book, which is the sequel I expected a travelogue, along the lines of A Year in Provence This book was much better It is the 7 year story of an Englishman and his Italian wife raising their children in Italy It involves the education of Tim Parks in all ways Italian, as well as the education of his two children, Michele and Sofi It was like be...

  7. says:

    An absolutely phenomenal portrayal of Italian lifestyle, mentality and society As an Italian who has lived in the U.K for over 6 years now, I have laughed and reflected on everything Tim Parks raises in this collection of essays, which I have dipped in and out of during these busy months I have also thoroughly enjoyed his out take and literal translation of Italian nursery rhymes, proverbs, and swear words in light of recent global events, seeing yourself through the eyes of a foreigner is a An absolutely phenomenal portrayal o...

  8. says:

    Basically boring Didn t like it the first time and it didn t improve for me when I was rereading it before heading to Italy Skimmed through for hints.

  9. says:

    3.5, ok, 3.49, not enough for 4 stars By the way, it s like reading about my school days back in the early 90s I read this book few years ago, but once again I ve been surprised how similar Italian and Polish upbringings are Or shall I say were, 30 years ago I know that Poland is currently going backwards as far as the influence of church on every single aspect of life is concerned, I don t think Italians are following the same path But although the two nations might ve gone separate 3.5, ok, 3...

  10. says:

    As a fellow Brit who has spent some time living in Italy, married and Italian and raised bilingual kids a lot of this is familiar to me I m not sure how it would come across to anyone not in a similar situation It s a bit too long, and I could have done without the couple of chapters offering close textual analysis of Italian lullabies There s also the danger, as always with this kind of book, that the observations are relevant to a specific time and place, and that Italians from other As a fellow Brit who has spent some time living in Italy, married and Italian and raised bilingual kids a lot of this is familiar to me I m not sure how it would come across to anyone not in a similar situation It s a bit too long, and I could have done without the couple of chapters offering close textual analysis of Italian lullabies There s also the danger, as always with this kind of book, th...

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